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Archive for the 'Children Psychology' Category

October 21, 2005

Motivation to succeed develops in early childhood

Filed under: Children Psychology,North America — Admin @ 11:10 pm

Disclaimer: None of the content of this article should be considered medical or psychological advice. You should consult with your health care professional for specific advice relating to your medical and psychological questions or conditions.

Have you ever heard about a child whom parents or teachers describe as lazy, unenthusiastic, and non-interested in any school subject or social activity? If yes, have you ever thought why this child is so low motivated, when he or she needs to do something demanding assiduity, diligence, patience, attention, tenacity, self-control and other important personal qualities?

While growing up these children meet obstacles in real life and do not find enough will power, strength of mind to overcome life difficulties and achieve goals. This happens because in childhood and during adolescent period, when important aspects of self-regulation and self-control build up, these children did not learn to be patient, assiduous and purposeful.

That is the reason why it is very important to make the basis of your child’s motivation to success, self-control, and self-regulation in early childhood. Sometimes it is much easier for parents just to close their eyes to many things thus allowing their child to do anything he or she wants and have “peace” without listening to the child crying or demanding anything. But this is not a way out of the situation, because now your child is having only a small problem, but while the child is growing up problems will be becoming more complicated and solving them will be much more difficult.

How can you help your child be more motivated?

1. Be sure that you are ready and have enough patience to talk and explain your child many things even there could be some misunderstandings and communication difficulties.

2. Do not be afraid to be strict sometimes, but at the same time try to explain all your actions, be reasonable and appeal to consciousness of your child. (For example, if your child does not want to make homework in math, explain your him or her, that now the most important thing is not the homework, but how strong and self-controlled he or she is, and the ability of doing important things, which children do not want to do.)

3. Teach your child to avoid words such as “I want to do…” and “I don’t want to do…” substitute these word-combinations with “I need to do…” and “I don’t need to do…”Also do not tell your child, that he or she is “the smartest, most clever…” or “the best person” in any field. Because when a person says: “I am the best…” it is the signal for unconscious mechanisms to stop accept new information. “The best” person does not need to learn or know anything. Isn’t he or she “the best” already? Instead of that, say: “I’m good in this today, and I will even be better tomorrow!”

4. Do not demand from your child fast results and improvements. Remember, you should begin with small tasks, like homework or house work help.

5. Teach your child to be enthusiastic and open to new knowledge and experience. Explain and show him or her that, for example, every subject in school can be much more interesting if they try to learn more about it.

Invest your time, efforts and teach your child to be motivated to achieve their goals with the help of patience, diligence, strength of mind, will power, and hard work. This will be one of the most important investments in your life, because in the future you will be very glad to see that your son or daughter is able to achieve their goals and become a successful person.

Madina Bakhitova-Niazoff, MS Psychology,
is the chief editor for http://www.psychologyspace.com – an online psychology portal providing news and information on various psychology subjects, discussion forum, psychology RSS feeds and web links. Madina volunteers at Wilmington Hospital’s First State School – a very special program for children with chronic illnesses.

October 18, 2005

One day in a Central Asian school for children with special needs

Filed under: Asia,Children Psychology,Developmental Psychology — Admin @ 11:37 pm

While working on a student practical task in one of the Universities of Asia, in Department of Psychology, I had an opportunity to visit a boarding school for children with chronic psychic illnesses or underdevelopment. That was an unforgettable experience. The boarding school was an old ugly building on outskirts of a big city, behind a ravine, and very difficult to find without a guide. Our group of students, walked there for about 40 minutes, and eventually we found the high fence and gray building behind it.

We were asked to put on white doctor smocks, and after that we entered the building. First thing that shocked us, was very unpleasant smell inside the school, we met the director and she told us that unfortunately the amount of ill children had increased and it had been very difficult to find any donations or financial support for school. She asked us to bring old clothes if we could, because school could not support everybody and most parents just do not want to know and take care about their children. Some parents visit children ones or twice a year, and these children are considered lucky.

Then we were led to the girls’ part of the boarding school. There were girls of different ages, and as young specialists in the field of psychology we were surprised that there were children with different levels of underdevelopment in one single group. Some of them had only some chronic illnesses without mental disorders, but they were treated like mentally ill patients! The day schedule was the same for them everyday – they were sitting all in one room, all together about 35-40 children, or they had small walks around the building. I must admit that we had tears in our eyes, because it resembled a prison for little criminals.

These girls tried to hug us and we understood that they are in great need of love and attention. They were telling us that their parents would take them home soon. Some of older girls already had menstrual periods and they didn’t know what to do. Workers’ salary in this school is very low and there is no enough personal and nurses to help every child.

In the boys’ section of the school we saw very similar sad picture. About 35-40 children were sitting in one room with walls and chairs only. Some of the children had become degraded in those conditions.
Having had finished our practice most of us confessed, that during several days after the boarding school visit, they were seeing those children in their dreams at night while sleeping. That was a real shock for us. Most of us could not eat and sleep. Some of the students brought clothes and toys to that school.

This boarding school and other similar places are a very sad unknown side of the otherwise beautiful country and friendly people. Here in the United States, I have a huge wish and hope to find donations and support for the boarding school I visited 2 years ago.

About the author:

Madina Bakhitova-Niazoff, MS Psychology,
is the chief editor for http://www.psychologyspace.com – an online psychology portal providing news and information on various psychology subjects, discussion forum, psychology RSS feeds and web links. Madina volunteers at Wilmington Hospital’s First State School in Delaware – a very special program for children with chronic illnesses.

October 16, 2005

Request Information

One copy of each brochure can be ordered free of charge using the form on this page. Simply select the brochure(s) you are interested in, complete the name and address portion of the from and click submit.

If you would like to order multiple copies of one or more brochures, please call 1-800-964-2000. Bulk orders are shipped via UPS Ground in packets of 100 with a maximum of 300 for any single brochure. Credit card payment is required for shipping and handling on bulk orders, which is $20 per packet of 100.

The brochures include:

* For a Healthy Mind and Body… Talk to a Psychologist
* Change Your Mind
* Warning Signs
* Se̱ales de Advertencia (Warning Signs РSpanish Language Version)
* The Road to Resilience

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Facts & Statistics

Filed under: Children Psychology,North America — Admin @ 7:47 pm

# Between 20% and 50% of depressed kids and teens have a family history of depression. (U.S. Surgeon Generalís Survey, 1999)
# An estimated 10-20% of children worldwide have one or more mental health or behavioral problems. (World Health Organization)

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October 7, 2005

Ideas for Helping Parents with Ill Children: How To Improve Mental Development of Children With Chronic Illnesses?

Filed under: Children Psychology,North America — Admin @ 9:27 pm

Ideas for Helping Parents with Ill Children: How To Improve Mental Development of Children With Chronic Illnesses?

by Madina Bakhitova-Niazoff, MS Psychology

Disclaimer: None of the content of this article should be considered medical or psychological advice. You should consult with your health care professional for specific advice relating to your medical and psychological questions or conditions.

An important issue for Psychologists, Pediatricians, and other specialists working with children is physical and mental development of children and adolescents. There are many age periodizations in child’s development and going through every period, child learns and gets new abilities. However, children with chronic illnesses like diabetes, sickle cell anemia, severe asthma, cancer and others cannot go through regular physical and mental development. Due to special treatment they cannot go to ordinary school like healthy children, sometimes they have to stay in hospitals for a long period of time. How to help children with illnesses develop mentally and not drop behind children of the same age?

1. Create special home or hospital-educational plan and organize short mathematics, logics and reading lessons every day or week. Together with your child you can make this time very interesting and useful. New information, which you can find for your child, will help him or her to feel completeness of life and self-efficiency.

2. Create homework assignments for your child. Begin with easy arithmetical (or any other subject) tasks. Doing it successfully will help your child to raise self-confidence and interest to new knowledge.

3. Even small tasks which demand accuracy (for example, measuring table in centimeters or inches) can be very interesting if you explain that every item around us should be planned and measured very accurately first, before constructing. Manual tasks demanding attention and accuracy are very useful, because they increase ability to concentrate and regulate attention.

4. Be patient and teach your child to be patient. This will help your child to be optimistic during treatment process and have positive attitude to the environment – some of the major components of psychological and physical health.

5. Contributing to your child’s mental development will help your child feel all your love. Receiving interesting information, positive attitude and cheerful mood create a special condition to improve health and stop illness progress. Help your child be interested in knowing more and more about this world, prompt him or her to be healthy and you will see positive changes in your child’s life.

Original Article URL

About the author:

Madina Bakhitova-Niazoff, MS Psychology,
is the chief editor for http://www.psychologyspace.com – an online psychology portal providing news and information on various psychology subjects, discussion forum, psychology RSS feeds and web links.

Madina volunteers at Wilmington Hospital’s First State School – a very special program for children with chronic illnesses.

August 17, 2005

Psychological Association Calls For Curbs On Violent Video Games

Filed under: Children Psychology,North America — Admin @ 11:13 pm

The American Psychological Association says violence in video games is bad for children’s health and the group is calling on the industry to cut back.

The association says research indicates exposure to violence in video games increases aggressive thoughts, aggressive behavior and angry feelings among youth.

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August 14, 2005

Psychologist says standardized tests undermine a child’s ability to learn

Filed under: Children Psychology,North America — Admin @ 11:33 pm

Some say they feel nauseous, while others wipe cold sweat off their brows. Then there are those who freeze up and lose their ability to concentrate.

And almost none of them are older than 18.

Psychologists call it “test anxiety” — the range of reactions students express when faced with government-mandated standardized tests.

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The Secret Life of Babies ; Their Young Minds Are Far More Grown-Up Than We Thought

Filed under: Children Psychology,North America — Admin @ 11:32 pm

She can’t talk. She just sits there gurgling, if you’re lucky. Or screaming, if you’re not. But now scientists have found there might be far more going on behind the unfocused eyes of a baby girl than just ‘I’m tired’ or ‘Feed me. Now!’

New studies suggest that the very young are capable of surprisingly adult emotions such as jealousy or even empathy.

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July 24, 2005

Video insight into babies’ minds

Filed under: Career and Employment,Children Psychology,Western Europe — Admin @ 10:22 am

Babies as young as three weeks will be shown videos by psychology researchers trying to find out how they understand other people.

The Cardiff University team are looking for up to 80 infants for the private screenings to discover how early in life children learn to imitate adults.

The babies’ response will be filmed to a clip of an adult pulling faces.

Dr Mary Fagan at the School of Psychology said: “We still have a lot to learn about this younger age.”

The researchers are looking for infants aged no more than five weeks old.

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June 30, 2005

Many Kids Think They Can Smoke Without Addiction

(Health Behavior News Service) — One-third of children enrolled in a family smoking prevention program believed they could smoke without becoming addicted, according to a new study. Yet, overall, the researchers found most of the children generally had negative attitudes about smoking.

The findings, published in the July/August issue of American Journal of Health Promotion, show that it is important for health promotion experts “to find ways to help youth realize how easy it is to become addicted to tobacco, the value of never starting, and that the risks of smoking far outweigh any perceived benefits,” say Terry Bush, Ph.D., of the Group Health Cooperative’s Center for Health Studies in Seattle, and colleagues.

Fewer than 10 percent of the children believed that smoking could help one relax or lose weight. The children were most likely to believe that smoking “can help people feel more comfortable at parties,” Bush says.

The belief that they “would be able to quit smoking anytime they wanted,” was held by 24 percent of the 10 to 12 year olds.

“We found very low rates of favorable attitudes about smoking among preteens,” the researcher wrote of the 418 families in the study.

The researchers found that children were most likely to have positive beliefs about smoking if they came from less cohesive families — those whose members spent less time communicating with one another or planning activities together and in which parents were generally less involved with their children’s lives.

Among the 281 children age 10 to 12 who had some positive feelings about tobacco at the start of the study, 43 percent reported fewer positive feelings and 28 percent had more positive feelings about tobacco 20 months later.

Parental smoking was the main factor influencing whether children would think more highly of tobacco a year and a half after the study began, the researchers found.

Despite this, Bush and colleagues did not find any evidence that parents’ attitudes toward tobacco, aside from actual smoking habits, influenced their children’s feelings about smoking.

“The lack of association between parental attitudes about smoking and preteen attitudes about smoking has not, to our knowledge, been previously reported,” Bush says.

The families in the study were chosen at random from participants in a large smoking prevention program administered by two health maintenance organizations in the northwestern United States. Families received a parent handbook, a videotape about youth smoking, pens, stickers and a comic book with antismoking messages, regular outreach from counselors and smoking prevention messages from their primary care physicians.

Bush and colleagues say their study is unusual in that it looks at children as young as 10 years old. Robin Mermelstein, Ph.D., deputy director of the Institute for Health Research and Policy at the University of Illinois at Chicago, says most similar studies focus on older children for a variety of reasons.

“One important reason is that most youth first experiment with smoking after age 10. Thus, researchers tend to be more concerned about measuring attitudes that might predict the behavior of interest, experimenting and progressing with tobacco use, relatively close in time to the behavior,” she says.

It can be difficult, she adds, to determine exactly how younger children feel about smoking, making regular surveys that examine behavior and beliefs less useful.

The relative lack of research on children is instead a reflection of “our ability to tap into them and measure fine distinctions,” Mermelstein says.

“None of this means that young children don’t have well developed attitudes at those ages,” she notes.

The study was supported by the National Cancer Institute.

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